Tallgrass Prairie & Fire

“The big bluestem actually rejoices in grazing and fire, if they come at the right time of year.”
-Verlyn Klinkenborg, National Geographic Magazine, April 2007, reprinted in Symphony in the Flint Hills Field Journal (2012) page 12

“The springtime sacrifice of grasses does more than fatten steers. It is the prairie’s only defense against woods and heavy brush.”
-Verlyn Klinkenborg, National Geographic Magazine, April 2007, reprinted in Symphony in the Flint Hills Field Journal (2012) page 17

“Nineteenth century prairie dwellers for instance saw them in every conceivable manner-the flames crawling across the landscape during light winds and racing across it during gales.”
-Julie Courtwright, Symphony in the Flint Hills Field Journal, Vol. V (2014) page 23

“Grasslands require a simple but important combination of three key factors in order to survive: a temperate climate, the grazing of large animals, and widespread, intermittent fires.”
-Aimee Larabee and John Altman, Last Stand of the Tallgrass Prairie (2001) page 21

“Applying fire, as ranchers in the Flint Hills so skillfully do, maintains grass dominance, creates environments for sundry species, both flora and fauna, and preserve the wide-open character of the prairie.”
-Julie Courtwright, Symphony in the Flint Hills Field Journal, Vol. V (2014) page 25

“A quality Flint Hills pasture has both grazing and fire.”
-Clenton Owensby, Symphony in the Flint Hills Field Journal (2010) page 99

“It is likely that early Native Americans started fires for a variety of reasons, including clearing detritus and attracting bison to areas of regrowth.”
-John Blair, in Last Stand of the Tallgrass Prairie (2002) page 24

“At night, the fires become a crackling show of light on the vast horizon, burning in a series of wind-directed lines.”
-Aimee Larabee and John Altman, Last Stand of the Tallgrass Prairie (2001) page 26