Social Studies

Index - SOCIAL STUDIES - Learning Activities
(Geography, History & Archaeology, Government, Economics, Sociology, Psychology)
  


LESSON PLANS are full format, formal Lesson Plans.  Others are brief format Learning Activities.

Click here for CURRICULUM STANDARDS to activities listed below.

No
Topic
Main Subject Area
Related Subject Areas
1
Place Names of the Kansas Flint Hills LESSON PLAN (grades 7-10)
social studies, history, geography
N/A
2
Use aerial maps to identify land use patterns
social studies, geography
science
3
Interpret the Flint Hills Map Explanation (legend)
social studies, geography
writing
4
Interview: your family coming to the Flint Hills
social studies, history
writing
5
Interview primary sources in your community
social studies, history, sociology
writing
6
History of humans and prairie fire
social studies, history
science; writing
7
Native American groups
social studies, history, sociology
writing
8
Osage Native Culture and People
social studies, history, sociology
language arts, reading, writing
9
Kansa or Kaw Native Culture and People
social studies, history, sociology
language arts, reading, writing
10
Interpret a quotation about bison and Native Americans
social studies, history
reading and writing
11
Archaeological sites
social studies, history
art
12
History of ranching and transportation
social studies, history and economics
reading and writing
13
Bleeding Kansas era and conflict over slavery
social studies, history
reading and writing
14
Diverse ethnic groups
social studies, sociology, history, economics
foreign languages; art; music; technology
15
African-American “Exodusters”
social studies, sociology, history, economics
foreign languages; art; music; technology
16
African-American settlements and prominent citizens
social studies, history
reading and writing
17
Role of women in your community’s history
social studies, history
speaking
18
Major historic events in your area
social studies, history

19
History of oil production
social studies, history, economics
reading and writing, speaking
20
Two major historic trails: Santa Fe and Chisolm Trails
social studies, history, economics
reading and writing
21
Rodeos in the Flint Hills
social studies, history, sociology
foreign language; writing
22
Interpret a quotation about the Cattle Ranching or Cowboy Culture.
social studies
language arts, reading, writing
23
Research a local historical character
social studies, history
writing
24
“Ghost towns” in your area
social studies, history, economics
speaking, writing
25
Voting patterns in your community
social studies, government
N/A
26
Demographic trends in your county
social studies, economics and sociology
N/A
27
Services and infrastructure provided by local  government
social studies, economics, government
N/A
28
Planning for impact of climate change
social studies, government
science, ecology, earth science; career, agriculture and technology, agriculture economics
29
Water quality issues
social studies, government, geography
science
30
Water quantity issues
social studies, government, geography
science
31
Where water goes after use
social studies, government, geography
science
32
Efforts to conserve remaining intact tallgrass prairie
social studies, geography, government
science, biology, ecology
33
Conservations easements
social studies, government, economics
N/A
34
Public access to tallgrass prairie
social studies, government, geography
science
35
Patterns of land ownership
social studies, economics, sociology
social studies, economics; business
36
Local real estate
social studies, economics
business
37
Local taxation
social studies, economics
business
38
Poverty in your community
social studies, economics, sociology
writing
39
Area transportation systems (i.e. railroads, trucking)
social studies, geography, economics
business
40
Transportation infrastructure of highways, roads, and bridges
social studies, economics, government
business
41
Major local employers
social studies, economics
business
42
Secondary businesses in the county depending on beef production
social studies, economics
business
43
Secondary businesses in the county depending on farming and crop production
social studies, economics
business
44
Economic development opportunities for tourism, recreation, and hospitality
Social studies, economics
business; health
45
Community organizations
Social studies, sociology
N/A
46
Scenic Byways
Social studies, economics, government
business
47
Local community festivals, events, and traditions
social studies, history, sociology
N/A
48
Decline in children’s outdoor time
social studies, social studies, sociology, psychology
science; physical education and health; family and consumer science, child development; language arts, writing, speaking
49
Substance abuse in your community
social studies, sociology, government
N/A
50
Raising a family in a small community or rural area
social studies, sociology
family and consumer science, family studies
51
Definitions of family in your community
social studies, sociology
family and consumer science, family studies
52
Senior citizens as leaders
social studies, sociology, government
writing
53
Issues involving care of aging seniors
social studies, sociology, government
family and consumer science
54
Examine local program - Meals on Wheels - serving needs of seniors
social studies, sociology, economics
business; mathematics; language arts, writing
54
Examine local programs - emergency medical and / or fire protection services
social studies, sociology, economics
business; mathematics; language arts, writing
55
Field of psychology - “eco-therapy” in Flint Hills
social studies, geography, psychology
language arts, writing
56
Local volunteer opportunities
social studies, sociology, psychology, economics
language arts, writing

FLINT HILLS LEARNING ACTIVITIES to Integrate Flint Hills into Existing Curriculum



 

SOCIAL STUDIES


(Geography, History & Archaeology, Government, Economics, Sociology, Psychology)


1. Place Names of the Kansas Flint Hills


In this Place Names of the Kansas Flint Hills (DOC) LESSON PLAN (grades 7-10), students can explore origins of county, town, and place names; classify sources of names; learn names and county seats of Flint Hills counties; includes numerous extended research and creative activities. (social studies, history, geography)

Geography



2. Aerial Maps to Identify Land Use Patterns


Students will use aerial maps to identify land use patterns in areas of the Flint Hills where intact prairie has been retained or lost. Students will discuss and write a summary of the reasons for the loss of intact prairie. (social studies, geography, science)

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3. Interpret the Flint Hills Region Map Explanation (Legend)


Students will interpret the Flint Hills region map Explanation (legend) to locate and identify special features such as towns of certain population, rivers, reservoirs, state highways, county seats, etc. How is your own county similar or different from the rest of the Flint Hills region? Students will write a paragraph comparing and contrasting their own county to the rest of the Flint Hills region. (social studies, geography, writing)

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History


4. Interview Family Members


Students will interview family members about why and when their own families came to the Flint Hills. What were the economic or other factors which brought them here? Class members share, classify and tally numbers on reasons families came to the Flint Hills. Students will write a letter home in the voice of their first relative who came to this area. (social studies, history, writing)

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5. Interview Other Primary Sources in Their Community


Students will interview other primary sources in their community about their experiences during major events or historic periods, their perceptions of social customs of the time, economic trends, differences from today, etc. (i.e. past floods, early farming and ranching practices, types of local businesses, women’s roles). Students will write a summary of their interviewee’s experiences and attitudes during these events and times. (social studies, history, sociology, writing)

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6. History of Humans & Prairie Fire


Students will explore the history of humans and prairie fire. When did the practice of burning begin? Why? How have practices changed over time? What is the impact on the prairie? Students will write a summary of the cultural practice of burning. (social studies, history, science; writing)

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7. Native American Groups


Students will research which Native American groups lived in their area. What is the name, history and culture of each of these groups? Why is it difficult to identify specific tribes’ locations over time? Why were tribes from New York in this area? Describe the impact of white settlement over time. When did our native people leave, and where they are now? Students will write a summary of the pre-white-settlement existence of one of these tribes, or a description of the disruption of their culture and loss of land in the settlement era. (social studies, history, sociology, writing)

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8. Osage Native People


Students will explore the history and culture of the Osage Native People. What were the early ways of the Osage people? What types of food, homes, clothing, religious beliefs, family customs, community organization, and traditions did they have? What are some words from their language? Where did they live in the Flint Hills area? Where did they travel? What trails did they use - for what purpose? After white settlers came to the area, how did their lives change? What was the effect of new diseases on their population? Where were the trading posts they used? When did they lose their lands, under what governmental acts, and onto what reservations were they sent? How were they treated unfairly? How were they discriminated against? Did any whites stand up for them to try to improve conditions? What happened to them during the Civil War? Where did they end up having to move? What did they lose during this loss of their homes? What legacy have they left in Kansas and the Flint Hills (names, places, etc.) To what other tribes are the Osage related? Where do they live today? Describe their leaders and government today. How are they preserving their culture and ways? What museums or centers preserve this history? Who were some of their prominent leaders? What photographs can you find of the early Osage? How do these reflect their customs? Students will write an informative essay examining an area of Osage history or culture. Students will present a power-point showing visual aspects of the Osage culture. (social studies, history, sociology, writing)

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9. Kanza (Kansa) or Kaw Native People


Students will explore the history and culture of the Kanza (Kansa) or Kaw Native People. What were the early ways of the Kaw people? What types of food, homes, clothing, religious beliefs, family customs, community organization, and traditions did they have? What are some words from their language? Where did they live in the Flint Hills area? Where did they travel? What trails did they use - for what purpose? After white settlers came to the area, how did their lives change? What was the effect of the Santa Fe Trail on the Kaw? What was the effect of new diseases on their population? Where were the trading posts they used? When did they lose their lands, under what governmental acts, and onto what reservations were they sent? What happened to them during the Civil War? How were they treated unfairly? How were they discriminated against? Did any whites stand up for them to try to improve conditions? Where did they end up having to move? What did they lose during this loss of their homes? What legacy have they left in Kansas and the Flint Hills? To what other tribes are the Kanza related? Where do they live today? Describe their leaders and government today. What State Historic Site in Morris County preserves this history? What special event occurs there every summer? What is the effect of this event on educating Kansas residents today of the native heritage of this land? What famous Pageant in Council Grove celebrates the history of the area and the Kaw Nation? How are they preserving their culture and ways? Who were some of their prominent leaders? What photographs can you find of the early Kaw people? How do these reflect their customs? Students will write an informative essay examining an area of Kaw history or culture. Students will present a power-point showing visual aspects of the Kaw culture. (social studies, history, sociology, writing)

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10. Interpret a Quotation About Bison & Native Americans


Students will interpret a quotation about bison and Native Americans. Explore the quotations section in this website’s Flint Hills Information Resources on bison and Native Americans. Choose a quote. Do you think this is true? Why do you think the author/speaker say it? What does it mean to you personally? Write a paragraph interpreting the main point of the quotation. (social studies, history, reading and writing).

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11. Archaeological Sites


Students will locate documented archaeological sites or collections of artifacts from their area. What types of artifacts are found? Where are they found? Are there any scientifically documented sites in the area or nearby? What sorts of reports are generated from these excavations? What age are the artifacts? What is their design and purpose? What do they tell us about the cultures from which they came? Students will write a summary of the archaeological resources in their area. Students will create an illustration of a prehistoric person utilizing one of the artifacts found in the area. (social studies, history, art)

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12. History of Ranching & Transportation


Students will explore the history of ranching and transportation in the Flint Hills. How do methods of cattle transportation help define the eras of ranching history? During what periods were cattle moved by trail-driving, by railroad, and by truck? How have the breeds of cattle and grazing practices changed over the years, partly in response to these changes in transportation method? Students will research and write an informative essay describing three eras of cattle ranching in the Flint Hills. (social studies, history and economics, reading and writing)

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13. Bleeding Kansas Era & Conflict Over Slavery

 
Students will explore the events of the Bleeding Kansas era and conflict over slavery as it occurred in the Flint Hills region. What was the background of the conflict in settlement patterns in Kansas and Missouri? What acts of violence occurred? Were any in or near your area, or were any survivors of this conflict residents of your area? Who was “Bloody Bill Anderson”? What is the “Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area” and what parts of the Flint Hills are included? Who was Sam Wood? Students will read about this era and then write an informative essay summarizing the effect of the national conflict over slavery on this region of Kansas. (social studies, history, reading and writing)

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14. Diverse Ethnic Groups


Students will explore the history and culture of diverse ethnic groups in their community. How and when did these groups arrive? What economic forces drew them to this area? How have they changed the local culture and how has the local culture changed them? Describe will create a power point presentation on how the language, art, music, clothing, religion, celebrations, family values, and other cultural norms make these groups unique. (social studies, sociology, history, economics, foreign languages; art; music; technology)

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15. African-American "Exodusters"


Students will research the immigrant African-American “Exodusters.” Where did these people come from and why? Who was Pap Singleton? Who was London Harness? What challenges did these residents face? How long did their community last? Student will research and write a summary of the black settlement at Dunlap. (social studies, history, reading and writing)

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16. African-American Settlements & Prominent Citizens


Students will discover other African-American settlements and prominent citizens in the Flint Hills. What were the economic and cultural factors which led to the founding and later loss of these communities? Who were Perry Lowery and Gene Lowery? Who was Bill Pickett? Are there other sources in your community with additional information on these subjects? Students will research and write a summary of the history of one of these black communities and/or its prominent citizens. (social studies, history, reading and writing)

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17. Role of Women in Their Local Community's History


Students will investigate the role of women in their local community’s history. What role did women’s organizations play in the development of community schools, libraries, etc. Did any particular women rise to leadership roles? Was there a history of active feminist movements in the area, such as for women’s suffrage? Students will create a powerpoint presentation on the role of women in their community’s history. (social studies, history, speaking)

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18. Major Historic Events in Their Local Area


Students will investigate major historic events in their local area: early settlement, construction of major buildings, celebrations, disasters, crimes, controversies, etc. and create a time-line of their community. (social studies, history)

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19. History of Oil Production


Students will research the history of oil production in the Flint Hills. When were the earliest strikes? How much oil was produced? What methods were used to drill, pump, and transfer the oil? Compare the wooden derricks and horse-drawn teams to equipment of today? How many and what kinds of jobs were created, and how dangerous was the work? Where did the workers come from? What were some of the boom towns? What was life in them like - housing, schools, social life? How did it change the lives of landowners? What is “royalty” and a “mineral right”? What was the environmental impact of early production before the regulations of today? Where is the Kansas Oil Museum and what can you learn there about early oil fields in Butler County? What was the effect of the early Flint Hills production on the effort to win World War I? Was there early oil production in your area? Were there any “boom towns” in your county - what is left there today? (social studies, history, economics, reading and writing)

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20. Two Major Historic Trails


Students will explore the history of the two major historic trails that go through the Flint Hills: the Santa Fe Trail and the Chisolm Trail. Where were the trails located? Where did they start and end? What was their economic purpose as a transportation route? Were either of them a trail for emigrating pioneers? What economic impact did they have on surrounding areas? What impact on Native Americans? What was their military use, if any? What was their cultural impact - what social, artistic, and cultural exchanges resulted from their connections of regions? What was life like along the trail? Students will write a compare and contrast essay about these two very different trails. (social studies, history, economics, reading and writing)

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21. Rodeos in the Flint Hills


Students will examine the history and culture of rodeos in the Flint Hills. How did they first develop? Where were they located, who rode in them, and who came to watch? What events did they include? Which were the first big rodeos and which are still held today? Who are some prominent Flint Hills rodeo cowboys and cowgirls? What is a ranch rodeo? How are their events different from professional rodeo? Do any people in your local area participate in the ranch rodeos? What is Mexican Rodeo and where are these taking place in the Flint Hills today? How are their events different? Students will write a summary of the history and culture of one of the rodeos they have researched. (social studies, history, sociology, foreign language; writing)

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22. Interpret a Quotation About the Cattle Ranching or Cowboy Culture


Students will interpret a quotation about the Cattle Ranching or Cowboy Culture. Explore the quotations section in this website’s Flint Hills Information Resources on Cattle Ranching or Cowboy Culture. What is your favorite quote? Why do you think it is true? Why do you think the author wrote it? What does it mean? Write a personal response paragraph interpreting the main point of the quotation. (social studies; language arts, reading, writing)

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23. Research a Historical Character


Students will research a historical character in their community and write a monologue by that character, reflecting his/her values and experiences. These can be presented in a dramatic performance. (social studies, history, writing)

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24. "Ghost Town" in Your Area


Students will explore the history of an abandoned community or “ghost town” in their area. Who originally settled this area? What were the economic forces that drew them there? How did the town get its name? How many people lived there at its height? What government services (post office, school, cemetery, etc.) did it have? What led to the town’s decline? When did people leave? What remains at the town site? Are any other area communities in a similar state of decline? Students can research local historical records and interview local residents to gather information for a written profile of this lost community. (social studies, history, economics, speaking, writing)

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Government


25. Voting Patterns in Your Community

 
Students will analyze voting patterns in their community’s most recent municipal election. Students will write a summary of their conclusions. (social studies, government)

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26. Analyze Demographic Trends Within Your County


Students will analyze demographic trends within their county such as age, ethnicity, poverty, etc. Students will meet in groups to discuss and brainstorm what might be the impact of these trends on various aspects of their community, and then share with the class. For example, how might this affect schools and education funding? (social studies, economics and sociology)

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27. Services & Infrastructure Provided by Local Government


Students will explore the services and infrastructure provided by government in their area. What are the basic social services we expect in our communities? What would life be like without these services? How much does it cost our local, county, and state governments to provide these services? How do we all share the cost for local government services - what kind of taxation is imposed? Is this the fairest way to share the cost? (social studies, economics, government)

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28. Plan for the Impact of Climate Change


Students will investigate the responsibility of community leaders to plan for the impact of climate change on the Flint Hills. How will climate change affect communities in the Flint Hills? What will be the effect on agriculture and the economy? How can people in this area prepare to adapt to these changes? What is “resilience” and “adaptation”? What other communities in the U.S. are facing these challenges and how are they preparing? Does your community have adequate emergency planning for extreme weather events such as flooding, extreme heat, or extreme cold? (see below water issues for drought) Students will write a summary of potential impacts of climate change in their area and ways their community can plan and adapt. (social studies, government, science, ecology, earth science; career, agriculture and technology, agriculture economics)

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29. Water Quality Issues

 
Students will research which governmental agencies protect water quality the quality of their water? They will identify the source of their own and their community’s drinking water: Where does our water come from? Who operates our water treatment plant? What is that agency’s budget? Where does the money for that budget come from? What regulations protect water quality? What are the current issues regarding the cleanliness and quality of water? Examine a case study from a community that has lost its water supply due to loss of water quality (i.e. Flint, Michigan lead contamination); then ask: could this happen to us? What are the threats? How secure are our water supplies from intentional (i.e. by criminals or terrorists) or accidental contamination? How could climate change flooding events threaten water supplies? What would be the impact on local communities if sources of water are contaminated? How could the sources be cleaned up? What can be done to protect water sources? What alternative sources are available? Invite the operator of your local water treatment facility to the classroom to describe the challenges of his/her job. Students will write a report making water policy recommendations to send to their local, state, and/or federal representatives. See also Science - Water activities (social studies, government, geography, science)

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30. Water Quantity Issues


Students will examine issues related to water quantity. They will identify the source of their own and their community’s drinking water: Where does our water come from? Is this a secure source of water? Examine a case study from a community that has lost its water supply due to inadequate water quantity; then ask: could this happen to us? What if we have an extended drought? What will be the long term effects of climate change? How could our community conserve water and significantly lower our overall water use level? If our community grows, will we have enough water for the future? Invite the operator of your local water treatment facility to the classroom to describe the challenges of water quantity in your area. Students will outline a water conservation program for the county. (social studies, government, geography, science)

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31. Where Water From Their Community Goes After it Is Used


Students will determine where water from their community goes after it is used. Also, where does storm runoff go? How is the water treated? What happens to runoff in your community during floods? Students will create a poster or graphic organizer that illustrates the course and treatment of wastewater. (social studies, government, geography, science)

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32. Conserve the Remaining Intact Tallgrass Prairie


Utilizing research websites and publications of the Natural Resource Conservation Service, the Extension Service, the Kansas Biological Survey, and the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as private organizations such as The Nature Conservancy, Kansas Audubon, and Protect the Flint Hills, students will write a written summary and evaluating what is being done to conserve the remaining intact tallgrass prairie. (social studies, geography, government, science, biology, ecology)

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33. Conservation Easements


Students will answer the question: what can landowners do to preserve their tallgrass prairie from development? Students will research conservation easements. What is an easement? What is a conservation easement? How do they work? Can landowners still farm and ranch on conservation easement land? What can they do and not do under the easement? Students will list alternative sponsoring organizations that offer this legal protection. Can a landowner receive payment for giving up his development rights? Are there any conservations easements in your area now? Why might a landowner want his neighbor to have a conservation easement? Students will create an outline of the allowed uses and disallowed activities under a conservation easement (social studies, government, economics)

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34. Public Access to the Tallgrass Prairie


Students will research public land resources, regulations, and management agencies in their region to answer the question of public access: where can I go in my area to observe and experience the tallgrass prairie? How and when were these areas established? How are they conserving intact tallgrass prairie? What protections are given to native vegetation in these areas? Is woody invasion an issue in these areas? Who manages them and what are their management practices? Students will create an outline of areas of public access to prairie in their area, and the different features of each. (social studies, government, geography, science)

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Economics


35. Patterns of Land Ownership


Students will explore the patterns of land ownership in their counties. How much land is owned by county residents? How much is owned by absentee owners? How does absentee ownership affect a rural community? What is the percent of home ownership and home rental in your community? Students will create a statistical spreadsheet of their findings. (social studies, economics, sociology)

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36. Real Estate


Students will investigate issues relating to real estate in their area. What is the difference between “real estate” and “personal property?” What is an “improvement”? How can we find out how much land costs? How does a land auction work? How is real estate described and identified for legal purposes? What is a plat and a lot? How big is an acre? In your area, what are the ranges in cost for: lots with homes (in your town)? For tillable farm land? For pasture land? Students will interview a local auctioneer about real estate questions. Students will write a summary of what they have learned about land ownership in their area. (social studies, economics, business)

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37. Local Taxation


Students will examine the structure of local taxation. Examine your local municipality and county budgets. How much does it cost to provide public services in your town? County? What kinds of public service do they provide? What would life in your county or city be like without these services? How are local taxes determined? What is property tax? What is a mil? What is the difference between “assessed value” and actual market value? What is the state sales tax level? What is your community’s sales tax level? What affects the rate of income taxes people pay? Why are income taxes considered “progressive”? Why are property and sales taxes considered “regressive”? Which kind of tax pays for our schools? (social studies, economics, business)

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38. Problem of Poverty in Their Communities


Students will explore the problem of poverty in their communities. Students will do background research on poverty in America. Then they will examine the poverty level in their own community. What are the causes? What are the solutions? What is the effect on children? What are wage levels in the area? What resources are available to help families in economic crisis? Students will interview a local social worker or poverty program staff-person. Students will share knowledge (anonymously) of a person they know in economic crisis. The class will brainstorm what can be done to alleviate rural and urban poverty. Students will write a letter to their congressperson to make recommendations to help people out of economic crisis. (social studies, economics, sociology, writing)

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39. Area Transportation Systems - for Example, Railroads, Trucking


Students will research current area transportation systems - for example, railroads, trucking. What railroad companies use which tracks? What types of products are being shipped? Where do they go? How do local merchants receive goods from outside for local sale and distribution - who/what companies bring them in? How do local farmers and ranchers transport their agricultural products and livestock? What trucking firms are located in your area? What different types of goods do they haul, and what types of trucking equipment do operate? What is the closest air freight transport service in your area? Do you have any public transportation (rail, bus, air) for people in your area? What are the closest public transit hubs from which people can travel without an automobile? How many local jobs are involved in transportation in your area? What types of training are required for these jobs? Invite a local railroad employee and/or truck driver as a guest speaker. Students will create a map of their county or multi-county area’s transportation infrastructure - highways, rail, air. (social studies, geography, economics, business)

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40. Transportation Infrastructure of Highways, Roads, & Bridges


Students will research the transportation infrastructure of highways, roads, and bridges in their area. Examine your county’s General Highway Map. How does the map classify roads according to the type of road surface? How does the map classify the different types of highways and roads in your county (or area) according to governmental agency responsible for them - “Road Systems”? What is a “Township”? Does it maintain roads? What county official is responsible for maintaining your County’s Road System? What is the budget for this department? How is this budget paid for - where does the county get this money? Invite your County Engineer to come speak to the class about the requirements and biggest challenges of this job? How many miles of roads does he take care of? What does s/he wish he had more money to do? How do new developments and new streets and roads affect the burden on local governments? Students will make a recommendation for needed infrastructure improvements in your area, including a costs of those improvements, and how they could be paid for. (social studies, economics, government, business)

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41. Major Employers in Their Community


Students will identify the major employers in their community. Which are local and which require commuting? What are the costs of commuting? What are the different pay scales? Which involve special training? How difficult is it for young people to get a job in these places? Students will write a summary of employment opportunities in the area. (social studies, economics, business)

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42. Secondary Businesses in the County Which Depend On Beef Production


Students will identify secondary businesses in the county which depend on beef production, such as feed and equipment suppliers, livestock auction houses, beef processing facility, etc. How many jobs are created in these ancillary enterprises? Students will create a poster or graphic organizer showing the interrelationships between beef cattle ranches and the secondary businesses that depend upon them. (social studies, economics, business)

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43. Secondary Businesses in the County Which Depend On Farming & Crop Production


Students will identify secondary businesses in the county which depend on farming and crop production, such as implement dealers, agricultural suppliers of seed, fertilizer, herbicides, etc. Where are crops stored? Shipped? What companies offer custom farming services: planting, harvesting, spraying, etc.? Where can farmers buy bulk fuel? How many jobs are created in these ancillary enterprises? Students will create a poster or graphic organizer showing the interrelationships between local farmers and the secondary businesses that depend upon them. (social studies, economics, business)

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44. Economic Development Opportunities for Tourism, Recreation, & Hospitality


Students will explore economic development opportunities for tourism, recreation, and hospitality industry in their area. What is eco-tourism? What is agri-tourism? How can the community enhance or create local festivals, rodeos, and public events? What are area hunting and fishing traditions and locations? What are local opportunities for bike races and foot races (i.e. 5K Runs); canoeing and kayaking, hiking, picnicking, and camping? What does Kansas Department of Commerce - Division of Travel and Tourism (Travel Kansas website) do to support these efforts? What is the Flint Hills Tourism Coalition? What social media groups exist to promote the Flint Hills? Students will create a brochure or power-point presentation on tourism in their area (social studies, economics, business, health)

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45. Scenic Byways


Students will research the 2 scenic byways in the Flint Hills. What are the official names of the 2 scenic byways in the Flint Hills? What government agencies administer them? What kinds of maps, publications, and websites will show these byways? Give examples of economic benefits they would provide to local businesses, and nonprofits, and communities. What non-automobile use do these routes get? Do you think they would be safe for bicyclists? Walkers/runners? Horseback riders? Why were these byways so designated? Research the background of their designation - was there controversy? Search web references, and find examples of reference to these byways in travel media. How do people traveling on them learn about the scenery, culture, and history of the areas through which they are driving? What are the scenic features of each byway? What historical background is relevant to each? Students will choose one of the byways, and write a summary of its background and benefits. (social studies, economics, government, business)

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Sociology


46. Organizations in Their Community


Students will identify various organizations in their community. Which are the purposes of these organizations: social, civic, economic, artistic, etc.? What role do they play in your community’s economy and quality of life? Students will create a graphic organizer illustrating the functions of the various community organizations. (social studies, sociology)

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47. Local Community's Festivals, Events, & Traditions


Students will identify their local community’s festivals, events, and traditions. How do these reflect the cultural norms and values of the community? Students will create a power-point presentation illustrating the background, events, and cultural values displayed in various festivals in their community. (social studies, history, sociology)

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48. Causes & Effects of the Decline in Time That Children Are Spending Outdoors, Especially in Natural Places


Students will analyze the causes and effects of the decline in time that children are spending outdoors, especially in natural places. How much less time are children spending outdoors in nature today? What changes in culture and technology have caused this recent change in the life style and behavior of children? Is this trend occurring in your community, also? More, less, about the same? What are children losing by being isolated from nature? What health benefits are lost - physical and mental? What aspects of social responsibility towards the environment will be lost? What will be the long-term effects if this trend continues? What can be done to change this trend? Students will write a cause-and-effect essay or a problem-solution essay on the issue of children spending time in nature. (social studies, social studies, sociology, psychology; science; physical education and health; family and consumer science, child development; language arts, writing, speaking).

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49. Substance Abuse in Your Community

 
Students will research the extent of substance abuse in their communities. How widespread is this problem? What are the causes and solutions? How effective is the judicial system in solving this problem? Is legalization an answer? What resources are available to assist persons with substance abuse problems? Which programs are more successful? Are there any local support groups or networks? If not, where is the closest group? What is the rate of cure of substance abuse? Students will create a poster or graphic organizer outlining all of these issues of substance abuse in their community. (social studies, sociology, government)

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50. Raising a Family in a Small Community or Rural Area


Students will explore aspects of raising a family in a small community or rural area. What informal social networks exist to support families in the raising and educating of children in a small town? What programs help young parents to assist in their child’s healthy development? What are the available child care services, health care, early education, parental support groups, etc.? How are smaller schools an advantage to students? A disadvantage? What resources are available to extend learning opportunities for students in smaller school? Some children in the Flint Hills are raised in isolated rural homes. What are advantages and disadvantages of growing up in such an environment? Students will interview young parents regarding opportunities and challenges of child rearing in their local area. Students will interview a now-grown child from a rural family, and create a written summary of his/her answers to the above questions based on his/her childhood. (social studies, sociology, family and consumer science, family studies)

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51. Definitions of Family


Students will explore various definitions of family. What are the various family configurations in your community? How do the numbers of multi-generational, extended families within your communities compare to the national demographic average? Identify specific advantages of having the support of extended family in care of children and elderly, and in dealing with family emergencies. Create a poster or graphic organizer illustrating various family structures and relationships in your community. (social studies, sociology, family and consumer science, family studies)

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52. Role of Senior Citizens as Local Leaders


Students will explore the role of senior citizens as leaders in their community. What contributions do older people make in your town? In what organizations do they take leadership roles and sustain organizations (municipal and county government, hospital, foundation, and church boards of directors, social organizations, annual events, etc.)? In what other ways do they volunteer? How do they serve and help build the community? How does this also help the senior? Is there a balance of older and younger people in leadership roles in your community? Is there a concern of who will take leadership roles when the older citizens are gone - will those institutions and organizations survive? Have any organizations been lost already? What are the reasons why seniors take leadership roles and volunteer? Students will interview an active senior citizen about their role in the community (design who, what, when, where, why, how questions). Students will write a summary of the various roles senior citizens play in serving their community, and provide a personal response to what they have learned. (social studies, sociology, government, writing)

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53. Issues Involving Local Care of Aging Seniors


Students will identify issues involving care of aging seniors in their community. As seniors advance in years, how does your community serve their needs? Do you have a Senior Center? What needs of local seniors does this center fulfill? Do you have home-delivered meals? (See related Learning Activity - Meals on Wheels.) Homemaker services? Does the grocery store have a delivery services? Is there any protection from financial exploitation? What sources of health care are available (home health care, pharmaceutical services, county health nurse, nurse practitioner, physician assistant, physician, hospital, special local outreach clinic-events, emergency care)? Are any general care-giving facilities available? Any day-time care of Alzheimer’s patients to relieve families? Any independent or assisted living facilities (an intermediate step between living at home and in a full care nursing home)? Any low income housing for seniors? How are these facilities paid for? What needs for seniors are unmet? How far must seniors and their families drive to access additional services outside the community (hospital, etc.)? What is the impact of this? If a senior cannot drive, how can s/he attend a doctor’s appointment? What policies would you recommend for care of aging seniors? Students will create a classification chart to match programs to funding sources: government-sponsored programs and health insurance, private health insurance, volunteers, non-profits, etc. Students will create a two-column chart regarding opportunities and needs for care of seniors in the community: on left - existing opportunities, on right - needs for additional services. (social studies, sociology, government, family and consumer science)

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54. Examine a Local Program - Meals On Wheels - That Serves the Needs of Seniors


Students will examine a local program - Meals on Wheels - that serves the needs of seniors. What service does this program provide? Why does this program exist? How is it organized and led? Who is involved? What is their budget? Where do they get the money to pay for this - is it adequate? Where do they get volunteers? What if they run short of volunteers? Are there areas of your county that are not served? What are the challenges facing this program? Students will interview a Meals on Wheels volunteer. Why do they volunteer to do this? What experiences have they had as a volunteer? Students will write a two part report: (1) a summary of this overall program and long-term issues, and (2) a description of the role of a volunteer - what they do and why they do it. (social studies, sociology, economics, business, mathematics; language arts, writing)

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55. Examine a Local Program - Emergency Medical & / or Fire Protection Services


Students will examine a local program - emergency medical and / or fire protection services. What services does this program provide? Why does this program exist? What are the alternative sources for emergency service? How is this program organized and led? Who is involved? What is their budget? Where do they get the money to pay for the equipment and personnel - is it adequate? Where do they get volunteers? What are the challenges facing this program? Students will interview a volunteer. Why do they volunteer to do this? What experiences have they had as a volunteer? Students will write a two part report: (1) a summary of this overall program and long-term issues, and (2) a description of the role of a volunteer - what they do and why they do it. (social studies, sociology, economics, business, mathematics, language arts, writing)

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Psychology


56. Field of Psychology Called "Eco-Therapy."


Students will explore the field of psychology called “eco-therapy.” How has exposure to natural environments been shown to alleviate depression and other mental health issues? What are the mental health benefits of gardening? How might the aesthetic beauty of Flint Hills scenery be especially calming and uplifting to people suffering from depression? Students will identify areas in their local region which could have eco-therapeutic value. Students will write a letter to their local mental health services organization and/or support group sponsor recommending outdoor activities in the area that might have a healing effect on mental health patients (social studies, geography, psychology, language arts, writing)

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57. Opportunities to Volunteer in Your Community


Students will explore opportunities to volunteer in their community. Students will approach local government, organizations, and non-profits to ask about ways young people could volunteer to make a better community? A few examples are assisting churches, non-profit thrift shop or foot pantry, senior care facilities and visiting shut-ins, schools, community clean-up efforts, drives for health care issues such as fighting cancer or donating blood, gardening and landscaping, child care, community festivals, fund-raisers, etc. Students will create a specific inventory of volunteer opportunities. Students will match their skills and interests to a volunteer position and donate a certain number of hours during the school year. Students will keep a journal of their experiences: What job skills are they gaining? What insights into their community are they gaining? (social studies, sociology, psychology, economics, language arts, writing)

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