Family & Consumer Science

Index - FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE - Learning Activities
(Food Science, Culinary Arts, Consumer Finance, Family Studies, Childhood Development)
 


LESSON PLANS are full format, formal Lesson Plans.  Others are brief format Learning Activities.

Curriculum Standards are in process of being added to ALL ACTIVITIES - by early July.

No
Topic
Main Subject Area
Related Subject Areas
1
Purchasing beef products
family and consumer science, consumer finance, food science, culinary arts
math; health; career, agriculture and technology, animal science
2
Purchasing local fresh produce
family and consumer science, consumer finance, food science, culinary arts
math; health
3
“Food deserts”
family and consumer science
business, entrepreneurship; social studies, economics; health
4
Family garden
family and consumer science, consumer finance
career, agriculture and technology, horticulture; physical education and health; math
5
Pioneer and cowboy methods of cooking
family and consumer science, culinary arts
social studies, history
6
Effect of play in “natural” places on a child’s understanding of the natural world
family and consumer science, family studies, child development
physical education and health; science; art, photography; language arts, journalism, video, writing
7
Problem of domestic violence in your community
family and consumer science, family studies
social studies, sociology

Flint Hills Learning Activities to Integrate Flint Hills Into Existing Curriculum


Family & Consumer Science


(Food Science, Culinary Arts, Consumer Finance, Family Studies, Childhood Development)
Pink Flower

1. Purchasing Beef Products


Students will investigate issues for the consumer purchasing beef products. What are the special nutrients found in beef? Students will evaluate the nutritional profiles of various cuts of beef. Which cuts are lower in fat? Which are more economical? How is beef graded, and what are the various grades of beef? What is the best way to cook lean beef? Is any beef processed in your area? Do you know a butcher? What is grassfed beef and what are its special health benefits? Do you know where the beef in your local supermarket comes from? Do any local ranchers sell beef directly in bulk to customers? How many square feet of freezer space would be required to buy a half or quarter of a beef direct? How much money would you save in buying direct over retail? Students will prepare a summary of the nutritional benefits of beef. Students will compare the costs of buying beef retail vs. buying in bulk (family and consumer science, consumer finance, food science, culinary arts; math; health; career, agriculture and technology, animal science).

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2. Purchasing Local Fresh Produce


Students will specifically examine opportunities to purchase local fresh produce in their area. What are the costs, availability, and sources of fresh vegetables and fruits in your community? What is the nutritional and dietary importance of this type of food? Students will write a summary of options and/or needs for local fresh produce. (family and consumer science, consumer finance, food science, culinary arts; health)

3. Food Desert


Students will define a “
food desert” and explore the nutritional adequacy of food sources in their own and in nearby communities. Where is the closest supermarket? Does your community have an actual grocery store? If not, what food products are available locally? What is the quality of the non-grocery food products? Is it all processed food? Are there any whole, natural foods? What is the effect on health of local citizens? What creates these food deserts? What is happening in the retail food sector - why are the small grocery stores gone? What are the challenges of a small local retail business? What would it take to make one succeed? How could more healthy food sources be made available? Students will identify food deserts in their area. Students will write a list of ways to improve local access to nutritional food. (family and consumer science; business, entrepreneurship; social studies, economics; health; math)

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4. Family Garden


Students will explore opportunities for improved nutrition and exercise, as well as economic benefits, from having a family garden. What are the out-of-pocket costs, yard space, and time requirements of gardening? What are the potential savings to a family? How could this improve family health? Students will plan layout of a small garden, establish a planting schedule, estimate budget. (family and consumer science, consumer finance; career, agriculture and technology, horticulture; physical education and health; math)

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5. Pioneer & Cowboy Methods of Cooking


Students will explore early pioneer and cowboy methods of cooking in the Flint Hills. How was food preserved and transported on the trail? How did early people cook over an open campfire? What is a chuck wagon? How did chuck wagon cooks prepare and serve food? What equipment did the pioneers and cowboys use? What were some of their recipes? What are sources of information on this topic? Students will prepare a meal that might have been served in these early days utilizing, as much as possible, the supplies and equipment of the pioneers. (family and consumer science, culinary arts; social studies, history)

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6. Effect of Play in "Natural" Places on a Child's Understanding of the Natural World


Students will explore the effect of play in “natural” places on a child’s understanding of the natural world. What is a “natural place”? Is a city park a “natural place”? Is a nature preserve a “natural place”? Do any school outdoor sports occur in natural places? How does outdoor play and interaction with wildlife and the natural environment affect a child’s personal values and understanding of the importance of the natural world? What is being lost with children playing primarily indoors today? What skills and insights can children gain from spending time outdoors in nature? What are the benefits to society of having children spend time in nature? How will the loss of these experiences for children change our natural and human-made environment; governmental policies regarding protection of natural places; mental, physical, and emotional health; scientific knowledge and progress? Students will write a newspaper editorial describing the importance of outdoor play in natural places, encouraging the city to create a park with truly natural areas for children to explore. Students will create a poster, power-point with local photos, or video presentation illustrating the social and civic benefits of outdoor play in natural places.  [See Also:  Nature and Children's Health - Learning Activity in Physical Education/Health section.] (family and consumer science, family studies, child development; physical education and health; science; art, photography; language arts, journalism, video, writing)

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7. Problem of Domestic Violence


Students will investigate the problem of domestic violence in their communities. What is the extent of the problem? Explain the relationship of this to social problems such as substance abuse. What is the effect of domestic violence on children? What resources are available in your area for victims of domestic violence? How do police handle these situations? Where can victims go in an emergency? Students will create a problem-solution power-point presentation describing the extent of this problem in their area and describing local solutions. (family and consumer science, family studies; social studies, sociology)

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